Miss A Columnist

After an illustrious career in real estate, Debbie Moore made a drastic change in her career and moved into the food industry. She began working at a vinegar manufacturer and later on produced her own vinegar line – The Pen and The Pear. Her vinegars were Ginger Pear and Pear Raspberry. Debbie also had a website under the same name where she not only sold her vinegars but imported food products from Europe. In addition, she sold the vinegars to retail stores in Napa Valley as well as the Central Valley. She also became a food writer for two Central Valley, California newspapers.

Writing three different food blogs, Debbie is now combining all of her knowledge into one blog which will be called – DRIZZLE - after her newly formed baking business due out later this summer. Debbie worked for a short time as a baker for a local Los Angeles yogurt company where she developed baked goods that were mixed in various
combinations of yogurt. She has completed her studies specializing in Baking and Pastry at Le Cordon Bleu. Debbie is now finishing up her internship at Chef Eric’s Culinary Classroom in Santa Monica, California where she has learned a wealth of knowledge as an apprentice learning about both sweet and savory foods.

Review Of Top Chef Brian Malarkey’s Cookbook, Come Early Stay Late

One of my favorite food shows for years has been Bravo’s “Top Chef” and one of my favorite chefs competing was Brian Malarkey. His upbeat personality, genuine infectious smile and of course his skills of being a chef for more than 20 years caught my eye early on.

Photo Credit:  Debbie Moore

Photo Credit: Debbie Moore

When my fellow LinkedIn connection, Amy Stirnkorb of Chefs Press (Brian’s publisher) sent me an array of cookbooks to review, Brian Malarkey’s “Come Early, Stay Late” was the cookbook I wanted to sink my teeth in to, literally. I love cookbooks, and have many of them to boast about. Although I have over 50, there are about five which are prominent in a cupboard in my kitchen that I refer to constantly. Brian’s book is so well written, with his anecdotes thrown in on some of the recipes, and each recipe is complete as it has a beautiful color photo so the reader gets a feel for the dish and what Brian is trying to achieve. This book is now housed in my kitchen as it will be an inspirational cookbook to refer to and one to enjoy for years to come.

Brian breaks down the recipes by his restaurants – Burlap, Gabardine, Searsucker, Gingham and Herringbone – San Diego’s finest. Mimicking my desire to go on “Top Chef,” I picked his “chicken brie sandwich + tarragon aioli” from Searsucker and decided to change it up a bit. Brian serves this sandwich on a ciabatta roll – I used an onion roll for flavor, big mistake as it didn’t hold up to the weight of the ingredients. Brian was right – ciabatta works. Also, the only other change I made was to add a thick-slice of grilled fresh nectarine – I liked the idea as it goes well with the brie cheese. Paired with a cup of my homemade Roasted Tomato Soup, it was a great summer surprise.

If I were you I would run, not walk to your nearest bookstore. One thing that Brian talks about in his introduction is “teamwork” in his restaurants. He therefore gives a lot of credit to his staff and has pictures of them throughout his book.  I love this.  When I was in culinary school – they couldn’t hit it home any harder than talking about “teamwork” – it’s the heart of any restaurant.

Food Columnist Note:  Brian has had a long standing commitment with various charity events and once cooked for the San Diego Liver Foundation Gala. Hats off, Brian!

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