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New Orleans native Thais Kay Cuffy sticks to one simple rule: Live life like its golden. On a quest for all things unique, inspiring and beautiful, Thais explores her current city of Atlanta in search of delicious food, interesting art, happening music, boutique shopping, and eclectic neighborhoods. A graduate of Oglethorpe University with degrees in Communications and French, Thais is Marketing Manager for an international software company, and has been freelance writing since graduating college. With a special interest in language and culture, Thais travels as far and as frequently as her pocketbook allows.

National Wear Red Day Raises Awareness About Impact Of Heart Disease On Women

Photo source: GoRedForWomen.org

Dressing up for a good cause (Photo Credit: GoRedForWomen.org)

On Friday, February 1st, 2013, millions of women and men all over the country will don their favorite red attire in support of National Wear Red Day ®, a movement created by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) to raise awareness about the impact of heart disease on women.

Heart disease is the number one killer of women in the United States and is responsible for one in every three female deaths. Yet, many people still think of the disease as mainly affecting older men.  The AHA, NHLBI and other organizations are determined to change this perception by encouraging women to adopt a healthy lifestyle, know their family histories and risk factors, and talk to their doctors.

Anyone can get involved in this initiative simply by wearing the color red on Friday, February 1st, and sharing information about heart disease with family, friends and co-workers.  The AHA encourages supporters to host local meet-ups and events and offers additional fundraising, educational and advocacy programs.  The NHLBI partners with New York’s Fashion Week and The First Ladies Red Dress Collection to shine a national spotlight on the deadly disease (maybe Michelle Obama will donate this year’s inaugural ball gown?).

Since launching the first National Wear Red Day ® in 2003, the AHA has raised over $300 million for heart disease research and education, and proudly shares these encouraging numbers:

Photo source: GoRedForWomen.org

  • More than 627,000 women have been saved from heart disease.
  • 330 fewer women are dying each day.
  • The number of women aware of their No. 1 killer has jumped from 22 percent to well over 50 percent.

To find information on National Wear Red Day ® in Atlanta, visit the Metro Atlanta American Heart Association’s Facebook page. For more information on the AHA’s “Go Red for Women” campaign, visit Go Red For Women on the web.

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